Sunday, August 18, 2019

colin chillag

Colin Chillag understands what’s best left unpainted.

Carlson Hatton

His home reflects the artist’s philosophy that living and working spaces should be seamlessly integrated.

marion lane

Lane takes world events quite personally, and she was finishing paintings during the run-up to what looked like US military action in Syria.

Kate Bonner

Artist Kate Bonner is drawn to distance, to expressing herself in works that create layers of separation between the viewer and the images and objects she employs.

Holly Roberts

In her photo-painting hybrids Roberts synchronizes the abstract and imaginary with the literal and everyday.

robb putnam

Everyone is a shambles every once in a while. Robb Putnam’s oddly endearing sculptures, by contrast, are almost always a shambles; they seem barely to hold themselves together.

darren waterston

Waterston has created larger oil-on-wood panels on which animals slip in and out of substantiality, dissipating like specters even as the audience tries to hold them fast.

brian bress

Equally attracted to structure and unpredictability, Bress strategically employs both to create his unique works, which are at once strangely off-kilter and genially appealing.

meridel rubenstein

“There are three things that have to be present for me to start a project-the body, war, and nature.”

jimi gleason

“Being a painter in SoHo, in the late ’80s, I kept seeing these Cibachrome prints, big shiny photos. I wanted to bring some of that back into painting, to steal it back.”

Laura Ross-Paul:

January 2009

jaq chartier

The question “Is it science or art?” is both redundant and moot for Seattle-based painter Jaq Chartier.

Reports

Critic's Picks

Artist Profiles

Spotlight

“Flower Tree,” 2014 Matt Wedel, NCECA

NCECA 2017 in Portland

SPOTLIGHT: Houston

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